Walk to Remember honors the loss children to stillbirth, miscarriage or early death syndrome

The Third Annual Walk to Remember took place on Saturday at Manistee Catholic Central. The walk was remember those children who died due to stillbirth, miscarriage or early infant death.

The Third Annual Walk to Remember took place on Saturday at Manistee Catholic Central. The walk was remember those children who died due to stillbirth, miscarriage or early infant death.

MANISTEE — There were tears, there were smiles, but most of all there was remembrance during Saturday’s Third Annual A Walk to Remember ceremony at Manistee Catholic Central’s Saber Stadium.

The walk was done as a celebration to honor the memory of the babies who died due to stillbirth, miscarriage or early infant death. It is done every year in October because that is National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Month.

Organizers Kim Anderson and Rogene Fischer said the threat of inclement weather did little to dampen the spirits of those who came to walk, reflect and honor those children.

“This is a celebration to remember the lives of babies that were lost to either miscarriage, still birth or early infant death syndrome and a way to support the families who are dealing with it,” said Anderson.

Fischer said they try to keep the ceremony short, but poignant.

“We have a guest speaker, take a walk and have a ceremony to remember the names of those who were lost,” she said.

Rev. John McCracken of the Catholic Community served as master of ceremonies and in his remarks he pointed to the very important reason for everyone being there to honor these children.

“We should never forget them and it is important for us to be here this morning to remember these precious children that were here with you for such a very short time,” said McCracken. “There were real, unique and they were special. As people of faith, we know they are with God and continue to live with him forever.”

McCracken said that everyone in a family feels the pain when a child is loss.

“I don’t know what it is like to be a parent and lose a child,” he said. “I know what it is like to be a great-uncle to a great niece and great-nephew who lost children. I know the pain my niece and nephew went through when they lost their children. This morning we want to remember their lives and remember who they are as part of our families and continue to ask God to watch over them and to especially watch over us.”

McCracken also read a poem called “Precious Little Ones” that was written from a child’s perspective.

Several special musical performances took place during the ceremony from Tucker Laws and Simon Malm as well as guest speaker Bob Wyncoop who works with Hospice in Port Huron and his son Bennett.

Wyncoop said that people who lost a child should remain positive for the future.

“You will keep moving, you will live and laugh again and you will love again,” he said.

People walked laps around the football field and then finished up the event with an emotional ceremony where they placed the name of the child lost on a piece of paper and placed it in a small outdoor fire furnace to burn in remembrance of that child.

 

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Posted by Ken Grabowski

Ken is News Advocate’s education reporter. He coordinates coverage for all Manistee County schools and West Shore Community College. He can be reached by phone at (231) 398-3125 or by email at kgrabowski@pioneergroup.com.

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