Burnt home razed

Crews from Carl's Excavating removed the burnt home at 212 St. Mary's Parkway on Monday, exactly six months after the building was lost in a fire.

Crews from Carl’s Excavating removed the burnt home at 212 St. Mary’s Parkway on Monday, exactly six months after the building was lost in a fire.

City of Manistee will pay more than $9,000 for demolition

MANISTEE — On Monday, exactly six months after the home at 212 St. Mary’s Parkway was destroyed by a fire, its remains were leveled.

“It’s been a long and tedious (process),” said Manistee building inspector Mark Niesen. “It’s very difficult when you get the other party to agree verbally and then they back out. It becomes very, very long for everybody, especially (residents) in the neighborhood.”

The City of Manistee will pay a little more than $9,000 to Carl’s Excavating for the work. For months, the city has been going through court proceedings in an effort to demolish the home.

In July, Manistee County’s 85th District Court Judge Thomas Brunner ordered the company that owned the home, Aldea Inc., to demolish the remains. After the company didn’t comply, city officials returned to court earlier this month and were given authorization to remove the structure.

The home at 212 St. Mary's Parkway was destroyed by a fire on April 28. No one was injured in the blaze.

The home at 212 St. Mary’s Parkway was destroyed by a fire on April 28. No one was injured in the blaze.

Aldea Inc. representatives never appeared in court.

“I am pleased that the city was able to start the process of razing the home as quickly as we have,” said Manistee city manager Mitch Deisch. “It’s unfortunate that the property owners chose not to participate with the cost of removing the burnt home, thus the burden to remove the home falls upon the city’s general fund.”

A lien will be be placed against the property for the cost of the demolition. According to Niesen, the lien will likely be more than the property’s value. The city will go back to court to attempt to recover the fees from the homeowner, he added.

“It’s just like any burnt house, it becomes an attractive nuisance for kids,” Niesen said. “Especially around Halloween time, we don’t need somebody getting a little festive and lighting it on fire again. It’s a safety factor that has taken way too long.”

 

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Posted by Eric Sagonowsky

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