Benzie Area Symphony Orchestra performs Oct. 2

BENZONIA — The Benzie Area Symphony Orchestra will perform its final concert of the 2016 season at 4 p.m. on Oct. 2 in the auditorium of Benzie Central High School, located at 9300 Homestead Rd. in Benzonia.

The theme of the event is piano performance, with featured soloist Dr. Michael Coonrod performing George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue”.

Michael Coonrod will perform George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue" as a featured soloist with The Benzie Area Symphony Orchestra Oct. 2 at Benzie Central High School in Benzonia. (Courtesy Photo)

Michael Coonrod will perform George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” as a featured soloist with The Benzie Area Symphony Orchestra Oct. 2 at Benzie Central High School in Benzonia. (Courtesy Photo)

Gershwin composed the symphonic jazz concerto in 1924, combining elements of both classical music and jazz.  “Rhapsody in Blue” solidified Gershwin’s place among America’s most popular 20th century composers.

The orchestra will open the concert with “Florentiner Marsch”, a march for orchestra or band composed by Julius Fucik, a Czech composer and conductor of military bands.

“The Love of Three Oranges” — a short, energetic piece written by Sergei Prokofiev — will follow.

“Serenade for Winds: The First Movement”, is a chamber piece featuring the orchestra’s wind  section and composed by Antonin Dvorak.

“The Petite Symphonie”, by Charles Gounod, is a beautiful chamber composition.

The final movement, “Allegretto”, will be performed by the orchestra’s wind section, including one flute, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons and two horns.

It closely resembles double instrumentation of a woodwind quintet, with the exception of the featured solo flute.

“The Syncopated Clock” was written in 1945 by Leroy Anderson while serving in the U.S. Army. Anderson was not only a composer, but arranged many of the musical offerings presented by the Boston Pops orchestra under the direction of Arthur Fiedler.

The premiere of the popular piece was May 8, 1945.

Johannes Brahms composed “Academic Festival Overture” during the summer of 1880 as a musical “thank you” to the University of Breslau for awarding him an honorary doctorate.

While not long in duration, Brahms still managed to include four distinct sections: Allegro; Maestoso; Animato and a final Maestoso.

The orchestra will conclude the program and its 36th season with “Colonel Bogey March”, a popular march with a familiar tune composed in 1914 by Lt. F. J. Ricketts (a.k.a. Kenneth Alford).

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