Songwriter Mark Royal to perform at Old Kirke Museum

MANISTEE — The Old Kirke Museum will present Kentucky songwriter/instrumentalist Mark Royal at 10 a.m. on July 26 in the next of its summer presentations.

Located at 304 Walnut St. in Manistee the Old Kirke is rapidly becoming a favorite cultural stop for people of all age groups.

Area residents will be treated to the musical talents of songwriter/instrumentalist Mark Royal at 10 a.m. on July 26 at the Old Kirke Museum.

Area residents will be treated to the musical talents of songwriter/instrumentalist Mark Royal at 10 a.m. on July 26 at the Old Kirke Museum.

Royal is a member of Bluegrass 101, a Kentucky based bluegrass band, as well as a founding member of the Rosine Diner’s Club, a band that plays bluegrass and traditional music, in the hometown of the Father of Bluegrass Music, Bill Monroe.

Royal serves on the faculty of Mike Compton’s Monroe Mandolin Camp and has played mandolin and sung with Don Stanley and Middle Creek. His talent as both a songwriter and an instrumentalist has made him a well-known fixture of the Kentucky music scene.

He writes songs in both the traditional and contemporary styles. Some are meant to be played by hard driving bluegrass bands, some could be played in coffeehouses, and some could populate any contemporary country singer’s portfolio.

Born and raised in Owensboro, Ky., Royal attended high school there and played rhythm guitar in a heavy metal band after graduating. His father, Irvin Royal, a multi-state harmonica champion took him to festivals to accompany him on the acoustic guitar.

Through his father he was introduced to a wide range of popular and traditional music as well as the blues and country. He heard Mike Compton play mandolin in the style of Bill Monroe, and the experience changed his life. Since then he has dedicated himself to developing his own distinctive style playing the mandolin building the powerful economic style played by Monroe and Compton.

Mark lives in Fordsville, Ky, with his wife Lisa and daughter Cassie and spends his time writing music, performing, and collecting and learning about vintage acoustic string instruments.

After Mark’s program attendees will be able to view the Madsen Lumbering Dioramas, which are housed in the Museum’s new basement exhibit hall. The exhibit space is definitely still a work in progress as Our Saviour’s Historical Society, the group that has owned and operated the non-profit museum since 1970, continues to upgrade the building.

At present a new electrical service is being installed.

All events at The Old Kirke Museum are free. Donations are accepted for the preservation and maintenance of the building, the oldest Danish Lutheran Church in America.

For more information contact the Old Kirke Museum at oldkirkemuseum@gmail.com

 

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