JIM CREES: ‘All these Jews need to die.’

By JIM CREES
Guest Columnist

“All these Jews need to die.”

And so… they did.

Eleven elderly Jewish worshipers attending weekly prayers in Pittsburgh died because… because they were Jewish.

None of them was a threat to anyone. One was 97-years old. No danger. Just folks praying on the Sabbath.

Praying.

Still, to some, being Jewish is a threat.

I’m sure many through this area were saddened by the massacre in Pittsburgh. (I’m also quite sure some were not.)

To be honest, it’s kinda hard to conceptualize such hatred. It’s hard to imagine how someone could shoot a 97-year old grandma in the head because she was Jewish.

So allow me try to help you understand. Let me explain who is a threat and who is not.

The good folks at the United Church and St. Andrews Episcopal here in Big Rapids are not a threat.

My wife and I are. She is Jewish so according to some she and I don’t deserve to live.

Those attending the First Methodist Church or Third Street Methodist don’t need to worry. They’re not a threat.

My son and daughter are threats. They’re Jewish and some twisted minds believe they don’t deserve to live.

The kids attending St. Mary’s School or St. Peter’s School are OK. They’re on the right team.

My grandkids, however, are Jewish. There are those who think they don’t deserve to breathe.

Some of my nieces and nephews are Jewish. Others aren’t. In the words of the Pittsburgh killer, the Jewish ones “need to die.”

My mother-in-law is Jewish. “They” already tried to kill her ‘cause according to Adolph Hitler she didn’t deserve to live in a pure Aryan world. They didn’t succeed back then in Hitler’s Europe, but they actually might here in the United States. Who knows?

That’s how it works, folks. Some people deserve to live. Other people “need to die.”

To you, gentle reader, this might be shocking or distressing. I don’t know why it should seem so.

It’s nothing new.

The Jews have always been a “problem.”

White supremacist Richard Spencer pointed out to anyone who would listen. “Jews are vastly over-represented in… the establishment, people who really determine policy.”

Down in Charlottesville participants chanted “Jews will not replace us.” (Psssst! A secret. They don’t want to replace you!)

After the events in Charlottesville, the head of the Anti-defamation League, Jonathan Greenblatt, said: “While the tragedy in Charlottesville highlighted this trend (of white supremacist racism and Antisemitism) it was not an aberration. Every single day, white supremacists target members of the Jewish community — holding rallies in public, recruiting on college campuses, attacking journalists on social media, and even targeting young children.”

And now this…

It may be hard for many of you to understand the depth of hatred that leads to something like the Pittsburgh massacre. It’s not hard for most Jews. They live with religious hatred daily.

Even here.

Like the woman who took me to task for writing a column about Hanukkah saying, “This is a Christian community… good Christians find this kind of writing in this newspaper offensive. If you continue to write about Jewish things you will lose readers. Why don’t you write about Christmas – the birth of the son of the only true God?” (Editor’s note: I do.)

Actually, all Jews around this country – including here – want to do is live their own lives.

My wife, kids and grandkids aren’t planning to take over the world or even infiltrate the highest levels of Big Rapids government. (I’m actually way too busy trying to figure out how to replace that one loose shingle on my roof to worry about world domination.)

We’re more interested in the price of gas and milk than the price of all the world’s gold we are apparently hoarding. (Hint. It’s not in my garage.)

We are more interested in watching a Ferris hockey game or going to a good spooky kids’ movie than plotting a takeover of the World Bank.

It the same with Pittsburgh Jews, New York Jews, Grand Rapids Jews… all kind of Jews.

They aren’t the enemy simply because they don’t believe as you believe.

Even if they are not baptized, they deserve to breathe.

Jim Crees is the editor in chief of the Pioneer, Herald Review and Lake County Star, all Pioneer Group publications. He can be reached by phone at (231) 592-8360 or by email at jcrees@pioneergroup.com.

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Posted by Jim Crees

Jim is the editor in chief of the Pioneer, Herald Review and Lake County Star. He can be reached by phone at (231) 592-8360 or by e-mail at jcrees@pioneergroup.com.

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