Turkey hunters discuss calling techniques

BALDWIN — Led by Gary Truxton, box calls were the subject of one of the seminars at the Pere Marquette Chapter’s Wild Turkey Rendezvous at Baldwin High School recently.

Bruce Cocklin of Big Rapids led a class in slate calls.

Box calls remain a favorite tool for area turkey hunters.

TURKEY CALL: Bruce Cocklin gives a slate call demonstration recently during the 33rd Wild Turkey Hunters Rendezvous at Baldwin High School. (Pioneer photo/John Raffel)

TURKEY CALL: Bruce Cocklin gives a slate call demonstration recently during the 33rd Wild Turkey Hunters Rendezvous at Baldwin High School. (Pioneer photo/John Raffel)

The 33rd annual event featured calling classes, booths, a calling contest, plus a turkey shoot.

Truxton emphasized to attendees the importance of buying a quality product to have success.

“They’ll last forever, as long as you don’t break them,” he said. “I’ve got one really nice box call I found in the middle of the road. I was just fortunate enough to be the next guy coming down the road.”

Truxton discussed with attendees the degrees of effectiveness with various calls.

“Turkey hunting is a great sport,” he said. “Where can you talk to and…yes you talk to ducks and stuff like that. To me, this is different. There’s so many different calls and so many different things you get into, and when to call and when not to call, like the cluck. If you don’t cluck to him, he’ll turn around and run away. You have to learn how to cluck with something.”

Cocklin went over the proper techniques for calling to draw a turkey’s interest.

“I always tell people if you’re out in the woods and you find out you forgot your call, you can use your ink pen for a (slate call),” Cocklin said.

Jim Skipper led a class on hunting techniques and explained the type of groups hunters may see turkeys and hens involved in during the season.

“One of the best groups to see is like one hen with two to three or four toms,” Skipper said. “Because there’s only one hen, you can often break up one of those gobblers. You may not get the dominant tom, but you’ll still get a nice bird.”

Always be ready for your opportunity, Skipper added.

“Whatever your effective killing range is with your gun, if that bird’s inside that range, and he stops and turns and starts heading away, you’d better shoot him now, he’s not coming any closer,” Skipper said. “You can’t do anything to get him back. He’s gone if you let him go.

“Know what your gun can do. Try to use a diaphragm call.”

avatar

Posted by John Raffel

John is a sports reporter with the Pioneer as well as the Herald Review and The Lake County Star. He also coordinates the weekly Pioneer sports outdoors page. He can be reached at (231) 592-8356 or by email at jraffel@pioneergroup.com.

Leave a Reply